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RTI Implementation: Requests and Appeals
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Name: 
Stephanie Trapnell
Designation / Organisation: 
Consultant, Governance Practice, GGOGA
Description: 
 Stephanie E. Trapnell
Date: September 10, 2014
Name: 
Stephanie Trapnell
Designation / Organisation: 
Consultant, Governance Practice, GGOGA
Description: 
 Stephanie E. Trapnell
Right to information (RTI) systems are practical components of government administration that reflect commitment to the principle of transparency. An RTI system aims to increase the transparency of government by providing regular and reliable information to the public and facilitating appropriate and relevant use of that information. However, disclosing information, maintaining accurate and thorough records, and sharing information with other agencies frequently constitute major challenges to an entrenched bureaucratic culture.

Performance monitoring of RTI systems involves the tracking of progress and an assessment of whether organizational objectives have been achieved. It is an ongoing process of collecting data on how well an RTI system is on track to meet its objectives, and it is extremely important for both real-time and end-of-year evaluations that feed into budgets, resource allocation, and investments in technology for improved processes. By collecting statistics and tracking implementation of the RTI law, agencies can determine how best to strengthen RTI systems. The data, if reported accurately and with useful metrics, have the potential to serve as one of the benchmarks for measuring the performance of a country’s RTI system over time.

This webinar will discuss the findings of a study on requests and appeals data published by central reporting bodies in eight countries: South Africa, the United States, Thailand, Jordan, India, Mexico, Brazil, and the United Kingdom. Overall, the unevenness of reporting in the countries included in the study suggests that a global discussion on RTI reporting could be worthwhile and enable more effective monitoring and implementations of RTI laws within countries, as well as facilitate the sharing of data on experiences between countries.

About the Speaker


Stephanie E. Trapnell is a specialist in open government and accountability. She is engaged in the development of measures for transparency, accountability, and outcomes, and the sustainable implementation of learning and participatory processes for performance monitoring. She is the research manager of the Public Accountability Mechanisms (PAM) Initiative at the World Bank and is a co-author of the publication Public Office, Private Interest: Accountability through Income and Asset Disclosure. She is also the editor of a forthcoming volume of country studies on access to information, entitled Right to Information: Case Studies on Implementation. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Sociology at George Mason University, and holds an MA from the Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies and an AB from Bryn Mawr College.

Speaker

Name: 
Stephanie Trapnell
Designation / Organisation: 
Consultant, Governance Practice, GGOGA
Description: 
 Stephanie E. Trapnell